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Cades Cove Pictures

Cades Cove, located in The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, is one of the most beautiful places you can imagine. More than 2 million people visit the Cove every year to enjoy its incredibly awesome scenery. And of course people love to take pictures of Cades Cove by the thousands. If you’re visiting this page you’ve probably visited the Cove and taken some yourself. If you haven’t ever seen Cades Cove or would like to see more of it from the eye of the photographer, I’m posting the most recent photos from Flickr.com below. Keep checking back because the pics will update automatically as more are added.

If you visit Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge or Townsend Tennessee on your next vacation and don’t get to Cades Cove, you’ve missed what the Smoky Mountains are all about. See what I mean below.

  • Cades Cove -

    sxahme3 posted a photo:

    Cades Cove

  • Autumn Spotlight -

    John Cothron posted a photo:

    Autumn Spotlight

    Stormy Afternoon, Great Smoky Mountain National Park. - Rays of light shining through heavy afternoon cloud cover in Cades Cove.
    (1/640 sec at f/8.0, ISO ISO 400)

    The isolated valley of Cades Cove in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park is the most popular area in the park. It contains a loop drive which can take hours during peak operation due to the number of visitors, which have reached 2 million people per year.

    It is a great place to view the park's wildlife, offers many scenic mountain views, and the preserved homesteads of the historic district are on that National Register of Historic Places.

    ©John Cothron 2017, For consideration only, no reproduction without prior permission.

    "I took the chance on this late afternoon hoping to catch Cades Cove relatively empty (nope). I couldn't pass up this lit part of the valley viewed from the loop road." - John

  • "Finally" A deer jumps the fence at Cades Cove, Tennessee | Judy Royal Glenn Photography -

    Judy Royal Glenn Photography posted a photo:

    "Finally" A deer jumps the fence at Cades Cove, Tennessee | Judy Royal Glenn Photography

    “Finally”
    Judy Royal Glenn Photography

    Yesterday, I finally was able to get the coveted shot I truly wanted while in Cades Cove—a deer jumping a fence.

    Sparks Lane and Hyatt Lane are two gravel roads lined with barbed wire fences. I have gotten a deer sneaking under the fence but never while they jumped the fence like so many other photographers have gotten.

    Finally, I have been able to sit at my desk and edit a photograph to post.

    The last five weeks have been so hectic with packing, sorting through items to sell, having a moving sale, and finally moving to Knoxville, Tennessee.

    We absolutely love where we live! Our apartment in nestled on a beautiful cove. My favorite thing to do is sit on my patio furniture cuddled under a soft blanket while eating my meals.

    This is a new adventure with my photography. Hopefully, you can sit back and enjoy God’s beautiful creation via my photography.

    To purchase wildlife and nature photography, please visit my website:

    www.judyroyalglennphotography.com

    Location: Cades Cove, Tennessee - In the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

  • Suspense on Abrams Creek -

    dan@propeakphotography.com posted a photo:

    Suspense on Abrams Creek

    The trunk of a fallen tree lodged in the rocks at the top of Abrams Falls adds a bit of character to this forest glen.

    The pool below the falls is a tranquil place along a hiking trail. The falls are loud, but consistently so, creating a sort of white noise that adds to the serenity. This tree, suspended as it is, adds a bit of tension to the scene. When will it fall? How long has it been here? Will a bear, raccoon, or some other animal end up making it an impromptu diving board?

  • chasing butterflies -

    hennessy.barb posted a photo:

    chasing butterflies

  • Bear_7266 -

    James J Bell posted a photo:

    Bear_7266

    Not the best shot, but I couldn't get much clearer since she was so well hidden in the tree. I'll take it for now and hope for a better shot next time.

  • Bear_7271 -

    James J Bell posted a photo:

    Bear_7271

    Momma Bear in the tree

  • Cades Cove, Great Smoky Mountains -

    Wonder Woman ! posted a photo:

    Cades Cove, Great Smoky Mountains

  • Home Sweet Home -

    Mark R Warren posted a photo:

    Home Sweet Home

    Home Sweet Home

  • Cades Cove -

    shaughnp posted a photo:

    Cades Cove

  • Cades Cove -

    shaughnp posted a photo:

    Cades Cove

  • Cades Cove in the early spring -

    Blue Ridge Walker posted a photo:

    Cades Cove in the early spring

    @Great Smoky Mountains National Park

  • Heading back tomorrow! -

    RansomedNBlood posted a photo:

    Heading back tomorrow!

    Nikon D3X
    24-70

  • Days Gone By -

    ALP Images posted a photo:

    Days Gone By

  • Creek Bridge -

    gricketts posted a photo:

    Creek Bridge

    Around the time William the Conqueror invaded England in 1066, the Cherokee Indians arrived in the Smoky Mountains. The Cherokee are believed to be a breakaway group of New England's Iroquois.

    By the time European explorers came to the New World, seven clans of over 25,000 Cherokee ruled over what is now parts of eight states. The Cherokee name for the Smoky Mountains is shaconage, (shah-con-ah-jey) or "place of the blue smoke".

  • Cades Cove, Smoky Mountains -

    AunteyEm/MichelleW posted a photo:

    Cades Cove, Smoky Mountains

    Photo: Willard Claw (1996)

  • 2029e momma bear seeking berries -

    jjjj56cp posted a photo:

    2029e  momma bear seeking berries

    What a sight to watch this huge momma bear easily climb to the top branches of this wild cherry tree, and climb out to grab the sweet fruit. The branches were bowing, but not breaking.

    Her three cubs were nearby, and eventually came up and played in the same tree.

    Taken with zoom, and then cropped. I wouldn't want to get this close! Those claws demand a healthy respect.


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  • Cades Cove MIssionary Baptist Church - Great Smoky Mountains National Park -

    J.L. Ramsaur Photography posted a photo:

    Cades Cove MIssionary Baptist Church - Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Due to a conflict and resulting division at the Cades Cove Primitive Baptist Church (see my earlier post), the Missionary Baptist Church was formed in 1841. Even though the congregants had no church building to meet at, the group of original members alternated meeting at each others’ homes.

    During the Civil War, the church was not able to safely meet due to political discourse. Following the Civil War, the revival circuit was in full swing and the church experienced solid growth. In 1894, over 50 years after being established, the church was finally able to construct its own building on Hyatt Hill. Shortly thereafter, the membership of the church steadily grew from 40 members to over 100 members. As a result, the church needed a larger building and constructed the current building. The Missionary Baptist Church on Cades Cove Loop Road was completed in 1915.

    On a personal note...on the same day that I took this photograph, my daughter received a marriage proposal from her longtime boyfriend. We were invited and got to be a part of their big day.

    Three bracketed photos were taken with a handheld Nikon D7200 and combined with Photomatix Pro to create this HDR image. Additional adjustments were made in Photoshop CS6.

    "For I know the plans I have for you", declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." ~Jeremiah 29:11

  • Cades Cove Primitive Baptist Church - Great Smoky Mountains National Park -

    J.L. Ramsaur Photography posted a photo:

    Cades Cove Primitive Baptist Church - Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    In Cades Cove and the surrounding Smokies area, it took faith to settle the American frontier so religion was a big part of life for the settlers. John and Lucretia Oliver, two of the first permanent settlers in Cades Cove, introduced the Baptist denomination to the area in 1825. Up until the founding of the Baptist Church at this time, the people of Cades Cove had to travel through the Smoky Mountains to attended Sunday services in Millers and Wears Coves. They also went to campground revivals in Tuckaleechee Cove, present day Townsend.

    The Cades Cove Baptist church was established in 1827 but, in time, a schism developed over biblical interpretation. One side said the scripture allowed for missionary work and others in the congregation said it did not. This problem was not isolated to the Baptists in the Smokies but was widespread elsewhere as well. As for the Cades Cove Baptists, they decided to rename their church in order to distinguish it from Baptists with other beliefs in the area. Their church became known as the Primitive Baptist Church in 1841. The small congregation met in a log structure for sixty years until this white frame church was built in 1887.

    During the Civil War the church closed due to the divided loyalties of the population in Cades Cove. The Primitive Baptist church members were loyal to the Union but Southern sentiment was also very strong in the Cove. A cemetery behind the church is the final resting place for many of the early church members and other settlers from the Cove.

    Three bracketed photos were taken with a handheld Nikon D7200 and combined with Photomatix Pro to create this HDR image. Additional adjustments were made in Photoshop CS6.

    "For I know the plans I have for you", declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." ~Jeremiah 29:11

  • 1965e mill race **Explore** -

    jjjj56cp posted a photo:

    1965e  mill race  **Explore**

    water flowing to the grist mill, Cades Cove..

    Photo of the Mill water wheel in the fist comment box below)

    Featured on Explore September 11,2019, best position #27. Thanks for all the visits and faves!


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    Alan