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National Park Photos

I thought people posted lots of pictures of Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mountains until I checked out how many pictures are posted of the National Parks on Flickr.com. It comes to more than 87,000 photos. Below you will find pictures from Acadia National Park, Crater Lake, Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, The Great Smoky Mountains, Mount Ranier National Park, Pertified Forest, Rocky Mountain National Park, Yellowstone, Yosemite and many more parks. Enjoy the incredible scenery of our country throught these beautiful pictures of our National Parks. And I hope you get to vacation in one or all of these parks if you haven’t had the chance.

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    Karen Grey posted a photo:

  • red bug -

    Karen Grey posted a photo:

    red bug

  • As Clear As Crystal -

    ivlys posted a photo:

    As Clear As Crystal

    Yellowstone National Park

  • Yellowstone Landscape -

    ivlys posted a photo:

    Yellowstone Landscape

    Yellowstone National Park

  • Footbridge Crossing - Bow Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta -

    LensEye View posted a photo:

    Footbridge Crossing - Bow Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta

    Banff National Park is home to some of the most beautiful mountain lakes. There are fabulous lakes throughout the whole region, starting in the town of Banff and continuing northward passed Lake Louise and the world-famous Icefields Parkway. From the Parkway, you have your pick of great lakes along the 140-mile road, some close to the road while others require a hike. Each one of these lakes could easily be your favorite one. One of the most visited lakes is Bow Lake, about 30 minutes north of Lake Louise. This lake is a magnet for photographers, visitors and tour buses. If you time your visit early enough, you can have the lake mostly to yourself. One of the most photographed scenes is that of the footbridge with the massive Crowfoot Mountain in the background. I decided to take a different approach by standing on the footbridge and looking south, with the lake and the magnificent Canadian Rockies on display.

  • Pembrokeshire, Wales -

    east med wanderer posted a photo:

    Pembrokeshire, Wales

    Sun and showers on the Pembrokeshire Coast Path

  • Lone Tree, Old Winchester Hill, Hampshire -

    east med wanderer posted a photo:

    Lone Tree, Old Winchester Hill, Hampshire

    On this NNR (National Nature Reserve) in the South Downs National Park

  • 20190615-1DX24790 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24790

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24762 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24762

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24806 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24806

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24781 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24781

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24758 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24758

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24769 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24769

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24778 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24778

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24767 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24767

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • 20190615-1DX24808 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24808

    Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta (Alcippe poioicephala) (or brown-cheeked alcippe as the fulvettas proper are not closely related to this bird), is included in the Pellorneidae family. It was earlier also known as the quaker babbler.

    This species is one of those retained in the genus Alcippe after the true fulvettas and some others were removed; the group had turned out to unite quite unrelated birds. Its closest relatives are probably the brown fulvetta, and the black-browed fulvetta which was only recently recognized as a distinct species again. The Javan fulvetta and the Nepal fulvetta might also belong into this group.(Pasquet et al. 2006)

    The brown-cheeked fulvetta is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, India and Southeast Asia. Its habitat is undergrowth in moist forests and scrub jungle. This species, like most babblers, is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight.

    This babbler builds its nest in a tree, concealed in dense masses of foliage. The normal clutch is two or three eggs.

    Brown-cheeked fulvetta measures 15 cm including its longish tail. It is brown above and buff, with no patterning on the body or wings. The crown is grey, and the cheeks are dark.

    Brown-cheeked fulvettas have short dark bills. Their food is mainly insects and nectar. They can be difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer, but these are vocal birds, and their characteristic calls are often the best indication that these birds are present.

  • The Beast of Foggintor -

    Christian Hacker posted a photo:

    The Beast of Foggintor

    To make the most of our summer holiday at home we chose another area of Dartmoor we have not explored before. Our plan for the day was a circular walk at Foggintor quarry near Princetown. Almost 200 years ago Foggintor quarry was buzzing with industrial activity and delivered granite across the country (e.g. for the Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square). Today there are still many ruined buildings spread across the old quarry site and it was a real adventure for the boys and us to go exploring! Once we arrived at the quarry and the ruins in the photo I was delighted to see that single cow standing amidst the rubble - a perfect motif for me! The cow was rather peculiar chewing on a rock as if it was chewing gum! I took a few shots then we continued our way along a former railway track.

  • 20190615-1DX24694 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24694

    Puff-throated Babbler

    The puff-throated babbler or spotted babbler (Pellorneum ruficeps) is a species of passerine bird found in Asia. They are found in scrub and moist forest mainly in hilly regions. They forage in small groups on the forest floor, turning around leaf litter to find their prey and usually staying low in the undergrowth where they can be hard to spot. They however have loud and distinct calls, including a morning song, contact and alarm calls. It is the type species of the genus Pellorneum which may however currently include multiple lineages.

    Puff-throated babblers are brown above, and white below with heavily brown streaks towards the breast and belly. They have a chestnut crown, long buff supercilium and dusky cheeks. The throat is white, and is sometimes puffed out giving it the English name. Puff-throated babblers have strong legs, and spend a lot of time on the forest floor. They can often be seen creeping through undergrowth in search of their insect food, looking at first glance like a song thrush. Some subspecies have streaks on the mantle while others, especially in Peninsular India, are unstreaked.

    The widespread distribution with population variations has led to nearly thirty subspecies being described. The nominate population is found in peninsular India (excluding the Western Ghats). The population in the northern Eastern Ghats is paler and has been called as pallidum while a well marked dark form occurs in the southern Western Ghats which has been named granti (includes olivaceum). The western Himalayas population is punctatum (includes jonesi) and in the east is mandellii which has streaking on the back and nape apart from having call differences. In the east of India, south of the Brahmaputra River occurs chamelum while ripley is found in a small region in eastern Assam (Margherita). Further east in Manipur is vocale and pectorale in Arunachal Pradesh and northern Burma with stageri further south, followed by hilarum, victoriae and minus. Further east are found shanense, subochraceum, insularum, indistinctum, chtonium, elbeli, acrum, oreum, dusiti, vividum, ubonense, euroum, deignani, dilloni and smithi. Several others have been described and many populations are difficult to assign to subspecies.This is the type species for the genus Pellorneum and its generic placement is assured although other species currently included in the genus may be reassigned.

    This bird is a common resident breeder in the Himalayas and the forests of Asia. Like most babblers, it is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight. Its habitat is scrub and bamboo thickets and forages by turning over leaves to find insects.

  • 20190615-1DX24706 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24706

    Puff-throated Babbler

    The puff-throated babbler or spotted babbler (Pellorneum ruficeps) is a species of passerine bird found in Asia. They are found in scrub and moist forest mainly in hilly regions. They forage in small groups on the forest floor, turning around leaf litter to find their prey and usually staying low in the undergrowth where they can be hard to spot. They however have loud and distinct calls, including a morning song, contact and alarm calls. It is the type species of the genus Pellorneum which may however currently include multiple lineages.

    Puff-throated babblers are brown above, and white below with heavily brown streaks towards the breast and belly. They have a chestnut crown, long buff supercilium and dusky cheeks. The throat is white, and is sometimes puffed out giving it the English name. Puff-throated babblers have strong legs, and spend a lot of time on the forest floor. They can often be seen creeping through undergrowth in search of their insect food, looking at first glance like a song thrush. Some subspecies have streaks on the mantle while others, especially in Peninsular India, are unstreaked.

    The widespread distribution with population variations has led to nearly thirty subspecies being described. The nominate population is found in peninsular India (excluding the Western Ghats). The population in the northern Eastern Ghats is paler and has been called as pallidum while a well marked dark form occurs in the southern Western Ghats which has been named granti (includes olivaceum). The western Himalayas population is punctatum (includes jonesi) and in the east is mandellii which has streaking on the back and nape apart from having call differences. In the east of India, south of the Brahmaputra River occurs chamelum while ripley is found in a small region in eastern Assam (Margherita). Further east in Manipur is vocale and pectorale in Arunachal Pradesh and northern Burma with stageri further south, followed by hilarum, victoriae and minus. Further east are found shanense, subochraceum, insularum, indistinctum, chtonium, elbeli, acrum, oreum, dusiti, vividum, ubonense, euroum, deignani, dilloni and smithi. Several others have been described and many populations are difficult to assign to subspecies.This is the type species for the genus Pellorneum and its generic placement is assured although other species currently included in the genus may be reassigned.

    This bird is a common resident breeder in the Himalayas and the forests of Asia. Like most babblers, it is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight. Its habitat is scrub and bamboo thickets and forages by turning over leaves to find insects.

  • 20190615-1DX24753 -

    siddharthx posted a photo:

    20190615-1DX24753

    Puff-throated Babbler

    The puff-throated babbler or spotted babbler (Pellorneum ruficeps) is a species of passerine bird found in Asia. They are found in scrub and moist forest mainly in hilly regions. They forage in small groups on the forest floor, turning around leaf litter to find their prey and usually staying low in the undergrowth where they can be hard to spot. They however have loud and distinct calls, including a morning song, contact and alarm calls. It is the type species of the genus Pellorneum which may however currently include multiple lineages.

    Puff-throated babblers are brown above, and white below with heavily brown streaks towards the breast and belly. They have a chestnut crown, long buff supercilium and dusky cheeks. The throat is white, and is sometimes puffed out giving it the English name. Puff-throated babblers have strong legs, and spend a lot of time on the forest floor. They can often be seen creeping through undergrowth in search of their insect food, looking at first glance like a song thrush. Some subspecies have streaks on the mantle while others, especially in Peninsular India, are unstreaked.

    The widespread distribution with population variations has led to nearly thirty subspecies being described. The nominate population is found in peninsular India (excluding the Western Ghats). The population in the northern Eastern Ghats is paler and has been called as pallidum while a well marked dark form occurs in the southern Western Ghats which has been named granti (includes olivaceum). The western Himalayas population is punctatum (includes jonesi) and in the east is mandellii which has streaking on the back and nape apart from having call differences. In the east of India, south of the Brahmaputra River occurs chamelum while ripley is found in a small region in eastern Assam (Margherita). Further east in Manipur is vocale and pectorale in Arunachal Pradesh and northern Burma with stageri further south, followed by hilarum, victoriae and minus. Further east are found shanense, subochraceum, insularum, indistinctum, chtonium, elbeli, acrum, oreum, dusiti, vividum, ubonense, euroum, deignani, dilloni and smithi. Several others have been described and many populations are difficult to assign to subspecies.This is the type species for the genus Pellorneum and its generic placement is assured although other species currently included in the genus may be reassigned.

    This bird is a common resident breeder in the Himalayas and the forests of Asia. Like most babblers, it is not migratory, and has short rounded wings and a weak flight. Its habitat is scrub and bamboo thickets and forages by turning over leaves to find insects.

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    Alan